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Heat Waves Are Moving Slower and Staying Longer, Study Finds | Climate change is making heat waves linger for longer stretches of time, exacerbating the effects of extreme temperatures.

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Heat Waves Are Moving Slower and Staying Longer, Study Finds | Climate change is making heat waves linger for longer stretches of time, exacerbating the effects of extreme temperatures.
https://www.nytimes.com/2024/03/29/climate/heat-waves-longer-slower.html?unlocked_article_code=1.gU0.cb8E.hOOHkE-9BG1M

How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions

How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions

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"Electricity and transportation each contribute about a quarter of America’s carbon emissions. Thanks to the growth of renewable energy and electric cars, those sectors are starting to get cleaner. Heavy industry is also a major source of pollution. The White House pledged billions for projects to spur a green revolution in those industries."

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How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions
Electricity and transportation each contribute about a quarter of America’s carbon emissions. Thanks to the growth of renewable energy and electric cars, those sectors are starting to get cleaner. ...
Melting Polar Ice Sheets Are Slowing Earth’s Rotation. That Could Change How We Keep Time

Melting Polar Ice Sheets Are Slowing Earth’s Rotation. That Could Change How We Keep Time

By Newsfeed


"Melting Polar Ice Sheets Are Slowing Earth’s Rotation. That Could Change How We Keep Time. As ice melts into water and flows toward the equator, it redistributes mass around the Earth, affecting the planet’s spin, a new study finds."

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Melting Polar Ice Sheets Are Slowing Earth's Rotation. That Could Change How We Keep Time
As ice melts into water and flows toward the equator, it redistributes mass around the Earth, affecting the planet's spin, a new study finds
How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions

How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions

By Newsfeed


"Electricity and transportation each contribute about a quarter of America’s carbon emissions. Thanks to the growth of renewable energy and electric cars, those sectors are starting to get cleaner. Heavy industry is also a major source of pollution. The White House pledged billions for projects to spur a green revolution in those industries."

Link

How heavy industries contribute to climate change and what can be done to cut emissions
Electricity and transportation each contribute about a quarter of America’s carbon emissions. Thanks to the growth of renewable energy and electric cars, those sectors are starting to get cleaner. ...
Lab-grown plant matter marks a step towards 3D-printable wood

Lab-grown plant matter marks a step towards 3D-printable wood

By Newsfeed


A new technique can grow wood-like plant material in the lab, allowing for tuning of properties like weight/strength…you can “grow” the materials in exactly the shape that you need, so you don’t need to do any subtractive manufacturing after the fact.

https://buff.ly/3lMUJMK

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Lab-grown plant matter marks a step towards 3D-printable wood
Chopping down trees and processing the wood isn’t the most efficient or environmentally friendly way to make furniture or building materials. Scientists at MIT have now made breakthroughs in a ...
At Google’s new campus, ‘dragonscale’ solar panels capture sunlight from all different angles

At Google’s new campus, ‘dragonscale’ solar panels capture sunlight from all different angles

By Newsfeed


This article reads like a Google marketing press release, but the design is pretty cool and is cutting edge in terms of some of these design aspects, especially the way the solar is arrayed to capture early morning and early evening sun to avoid the standard peak of solar panels at noon.

– At Google’s newly opened campus in Mountain View, California, it isn’t immediately obvious that the roofs are covered in solar panels. But the sprawling canopies on each building—looking a little like futuristic circus tents—are covered in 50,000 small, silver-colored “dragonscale” photovoltaic panels, shaped to optimize the times they can generate solar power throughout the day

– It’s part of an approach that the company, along with architects from Bjarke Ingels Group and Heatherwick Studio, took to making the new campus, which covers more than a million square feet, as sustainable as possible. In an area currently undergoing a severe drought, it’s designed to save water. A massive geothermal system, the largest in North America, makes it possible to heat and cool the buildings without fossil fuels. The landscaping helps support biodiversity. The buildings’ solar skins, along with local wind power, will help the campus work toward Google’s goal of running on 100% renewable power, 24-7, by the end of the decade. (Right now, it runs on 90% renewable power.)

– Typical solar panels generate power in the middle of the day, and as the amount of solar power in California has grown, the state has struggled to deal with the mismatch between the time that power is generated and the time that it’s used. “Every year, clean energy from solar plants gets curtailed in the middle of the day because it’s too much, and there isn’t enough load,” Tahir says. Because the solar panels sit on the new roofs facing different angles, some catch more light early in the morning and others get more afternoon light, both times when the larger electric grid has less renewable energy.

– The team also focused on the aesthetics of the panels. “We went deep into understanding the solar supply chain, how panels are manufactured, figuring out where we might have the ability to change components, elements, and all that you need—that vision,” he says. “So that in this case, the goal was really to show that it can be beautiful and efficient at the same time.”

– Underground, a geothermal field taps into the steady temperature below the surface  to pump heat back and forth for heating and cooling. The geothermal system helps cut carbon emissions on the site in half. It also shrinks the huge amount of water that would have been used in a standard cooling tower, eliminating the use of around five million gallons of water a year.

-What really allowed us to become ‘net positive,’ generating more reclaimed water than we’re using, was reducing demand,” says Tahir. The campus also recycles any water that’s used, so it can be used again to flush toilets and irrigate the landscape. Rain is collected in above-ground pools and also combined with the recycled water.

– The grounds, restored to bring back native habitat, connect to a public trail with native plants next to a stream that’s home to wildlife

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At Google’s new campus, ‘dragonscale’ solar panels capture sunlight from all different angles
The company’s Mountain View, California, offices feature curved roofs and textured solar panels that optimize the hours they can generate electricity. It’s just one sustainability feature of the ...
Will this ‘ocean battery’ buried in the seabed be an offshore wind game changer?

Will this ‘ocean battery’ buried in the seabed be an offshore wind game changer?

By Newsfeed


"Offshore wind power needs energy storage and power regulation, and Ocean Grazer has invented an offshore energy storage system that will sit at the bottom of the sea and manage the flow of electricity through the power grid.

Ocean Battery is based on hydro dam technology that can be deployed at the source of power generation. Excess wind power is routed toward the Ocean Battery that pumps water from its underground reservoirs into the flexible bladders installed at the seabed. Whenever there is a demand for power, water is routed through hydro turbines to generate electricity back into the underground reservoirs.

Ocean Grazer claims that Ocean Battery has an efficiency of around 80% and that it should be able to run unlimited cycles for more than 20 years. The company, which announced on January 6 that it has closed a deal with an angel investor, will deploy an onshore Ocean Battery in the Netherlands by 2023 and aims to have an offshore system in place by 2025."

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Will this 'ocean battery' buried in the seabed be an offshore wind game changer?
Offshore wind power needs energy storage and regulation, and Ocean Grazer has invented a "battery" that sits at the bottom of the sea.
Boaty McBoatface Prepares to Dive Under Antarctica’s Doomsday Glacier

Boaty McBoatface Prepares to Dive Under Antarctica’s Doomsday Glacier

By Newsfeed


Good pop science article on next steps to find out what is going on with Thwaites:

"The team is part of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration, which has spent the past few years documenting what’s going there. Their findings have been, to put it lightly, pretty unnerving. Poking and prodding the glacier and ice shelf that extends over the Amundsen Sea have revealed warm water rapidly carving channels deep into the ice and pushing farther inland. In a summary of their findings given late last year, researchers revealed that parts of the ice shelf are receding as fast as 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) per year, and the glacier could become completely unmoored from the bedrock it sits on by the time we’re ringing in the new year in 2030.

“Before we get more data, what we only know is that the ocean is melting the ice shelves,” Rob Hall and Yxi Xheng, scientists at the University of East Anglia, and Rob Larter, a researcher with the British Antarctic Survey, wrote in a joint email while en route to Thwaites. “So we’re expecting to find signal[s] of meltwater discharge from the base of ice shelves. But how much and how fast the ice shelves are melting are still uncertain. We want to get more data showing how much heat is transported toward the glaciers, and at the same time to get data showing how the ocean conditions are changing due to the melting glaciers.”

All this effort will help us understand what’s going on with Thwaites Glacier and refine projections of sea level rise. The fate of humanity really is in Thwaites’ icy hands. The glacier is a key buttress against West Antarctica, a region that contains enough ice to raise sea 10 feet (3 meters) globally. While all that ice wouldn’t immediately pour into the ocean if Thwaites disappeared, it would certainly speed up the transition from the “fucking around” to the “finding out” phase of climate change.
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Boaty McBoatface Prepares to Dive Under Antarctica's Doomsday Glacier
Scientists are dispatching the autonomous sub and a host of other instruments to get a detailed view of the what's going on under Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier.